Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

 

School Overview

Detail Data
 School name Westcroft School
Pupils in school 187
Proportion of disadvantaged pupils 67.1% Primary; 60.6% Secondary
Pupil premium allocation this academic year £123,030
Academic year or years covered by statement 2021-2023
Publish date 30.07.21 (Re-published Dec 2021)
Review date 01.07.22
Statement authorised by H Andrioli
Pupil premium lead H Andrioli
Governor lead Chair of LGB/CFO

Funding Overview

Detail Amount
Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year £124, 910
Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year £0
Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable) £0
Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£124, 910

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

Our aim is to use pupil premium funding to help us achieve and sustain positive outcomes for our disadvantaged pupils. The number of pupils eligible for Pupil Premium has risen significantly over the last few years from 44.7% to 63.9%.

Whilst socio-economic disadvantage is not always the primary challenge our pupils face, we do see that many pupils have additional needs or multiple needs as detailed within their Education Health and Care Plans such as:

·         Communication and Interaction needs

·         Number of pupils with a diagnosis of Autism or Autistic traits

·         Number of pupils requiring additional Speech and Language Intervention

·         Number of pupils requiring sensory or physical intervention

·         Number of pupils requiring care support for toileting and medical needs

 

At the heart of our approach is high-quality teaching focussed on areas that the pupils require it most, targeted support based on robust diagnostic assessment of need, and helping pupils to access a broad and balanced curriculum.

Although our strategy is focused on the needs of disadvantaged pupils, it will benefit all pupils in our school where funding is spent on whole-school approaches, such as high-quality teaching. Implicit in the intended outcomes detailed below, is the intention that outcomes for non-disadvantaged pupils will be improved alongside progress for their disadvantaged peers.

Our strategy is integral to wider school plans for recovery, notably through the engagement of a tutor in school to provide additional support for pupils who are not making expected progress.

Our strategy will be driven by the needs and strengths of each young person, based on formal and informal assessments, not assumptions or labels. This will help us to ensure that we offer them the relevant skills and experience they require to be prepared for adulthood.

 

 

 

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number Detail of challenge
1 Our assessments show that disadvantaged pupils generally make less progress from their starting points when entering school. Whilst the types of barriers to learning and the difficulties disadvantaged pupils experience vary, their overall academic progress tends to be lower in most subjects.
2 Our assessments, observations and discussions with pupils show that disadvantaged pupils are generally more likely to have language comprehension difficulties compared to non-disadvantaged pupils in our school.
3 Our assessments, observations and discussions with pupils show that disadvantaged pupils generally have greater challenges around communicating and expressing their needs than their peers, including non-verbal, limited language and social interaction difficulties.
4 Through observations and conversations with pupils and their families, we find that pupils are less able to care for themselves appropriately, for example, toileting.
5 Our assessments, observations and conversations with pupils indicate that pupils often require additional support to develop personal skills and manage their emotions appropriately.
6 Our assessments, observations and discussions with pupils and families demonstrate that the education, wellbeing and wider aspects of development of many of our disadvantaged pupils have been impacted by the pandemic to a greater extent than for other pupils. These findings are backed up by several national studies.

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome Success criteria
Improved attainment for disadvantaged pupils in all subjects, relative to their starting points as identified through baseline assessments.

 

Through achievement of improved performance, as demonstrated by our end of year assessments at the end of our strategy in 2024/25.

Improve the quality of reading materials throughout the school.

Identify and provide additional support for pupils not making expected progress.

 

Improved language comprehension for disadvantaged pupils so that they can independently comprehend the curriculum content. Assessment of pupils’ language comprehension shows a reduction in the disparity in outcomes between disadvantaged pupils and their peers in our school. The number of pupils receiving external Speech and Language therapy is reduced by an average of 6 to 8 pupils per year by the end of our strategy in 2024/25.
Pupils can use a range of communication systems to aid their understanding and to develop expressive communication skills. Through achievement of EHC plan termly outcomes.
Increase time spent in class through having additional care support when needed. Classroom staff are able to remain in class.

Pupils develop their self-care skills so that can manage independently.

Provide support for Health and Well being

 

 

Identify pupils requiring mental health support through the internal referral system.

Provide interventions through the mentoring programme.

Provide CPD for staff to enable them to further support pupils in class.

 

Provide additional Physical and Sensory support for physical development Identify pupils requiring additional physical support

Provide interventions as required

Identify pupils requiring sensory interventions

CPD for Cool Kids programme to develop physical literacy for pupils

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £107,000

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Employment of Health and Well Being Mentor and intervention programmes in place for pupils as required. There is strong evidence both Nationally and Locally that children and young people suffering from mental health issues has significantly increased over the last 2-3 years.

Local support remains mostly inappropriate for children and young people with learning disabilities and those services that are suitable are hugely oversubscribed with waiting times anywhere between 6 months and 8 months for initial screening appointments.

1, 3, 5, 6
Employment of Speech and Language Technicians to support the implementation of individual programmes but also Social Use of Language programmes and individual support with communication. The number of individuals requiring Speech and Language Therapy has increased.

The number of pupils requiring SCERTS, PECS and Makaton to assist with communication has increased.

1, 2, 3, 6
Employment of a tutor in school to support pupils not making expected progress.

Study programmes in place as required.

Tuition targeted at specific needs and knowledge gaps can be an effective method to support low attaining pupils or those falling behind, both one-to-one:

One to one tuition | EEF (educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

 

Pupils identified through analysis of progress data.

1, 6
Employment of a Physical and Sensory Mentor in school.

 

Individual programmes in place as required.

The number of pupils requiring physical therapy and sensory regulation has increased.

This is reflected in EHCP outcomes.

1, 3, 5, 6

 

Wider strategies

Budgeted cost: £18 000

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Enhancing the sensory regulation equipment available for PP learners with enhanced sensory needs, including autism. We will also fund staff training. We have observed that sensory equipment and resources such as sensory circuits and sensory “snacks” are beneficial for pupils.

 

1, 3, 5
Ensuring reading materials are age appropriate whilst sitting within an appropriate level for the pupils.

Phonics resources are also updated.

New materials have been sourced through Oxford University Press. 1, 2, 3, 6
Developing Teaching and Learning by delivering CPD for staff to use a range of approaches and strategies such as SCERTS. Recommended by the schools Educational Psychology team.

 

1, 2, 3, 6
Develop the pupils self-care skills by employing care support assistants Classroom staff remain in class therefore disruption for other pupils is minimised.

Care Assistants work with other Health Professionals to deliver programmes to support self-care skills.

 

4

 Total budgeted cost: £125,000

 

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

Our internal assessments during 2020/21 indicated that disadvantaged pupils academic and wider development outcomes were in general below what was anticipated. Despite being on track during the first year (2018/19), the outcomes we aimed to achieve in our previous strategy by the end of 2020/21 were therefore not fully realised.

Our assessment of the reasons for these outcomes points primarily to Covid-19 impact. This disrupted the teaching of all subject areas and had a negative impact on most pupils’ development to varying degrees, particularly in limiting opportunities to progress social and communication skills and independence.

We mitigated the impact on academic outcomes by our resolution to maintain a high quality curriculum, even when pupils were not in school. Engagement in on line learning was 76% overall with some pupils attending in person.  However, it was challenging to provide differentiated support to our pupils online.

Our assessments and observations suggested that for many pupils, being out of school, uncertainty and concern over their future and challenges around access to support were detrimental to behaviour, wellbeing and mental health to varying degrees. We used pupil premium funding to help provide wellbeing support and targeted interventions where required.

The impact of all of these challenges was greatest on our disadvantaged pupils, as has been evidenced across the country, and they were not able to benefit from our pupil premium funded improvements to teaching or targeted interventions to the degree that we intended.

Further information (optional)

Additional activity

Our pupil premium strategy will be supplemented by additional activity that we are not funding using pupil premium or recovery premium. That will include:

·         Working in partnership with local colleges and FE providers to provide opportunities such as taster courses, link programmes and mentoring to enable young people with SEN to familiarise themselves with the college environment and gain some experience of college life and study.

·         Utilising the local area and community to enhance the curriculum through Educational Visits.

·         Providing all pupils from Key Stage 2 upwards with subsidised opportunities for residential visits

·         Developing communication and interaction skills through the local School Sports Partnership and opportunities for competition

·         Enabling further training for the School Councils representatives to become Digital Ambassadors (Wider Learning)

·         Other professional colleagues visiting school to enhance the curriculum such as the Music Service

Planning, implementation and evaluation

In planning our new pupil premium strategy, we evaluated why activity undertaken in previous years had not had the degree of impact that we had expected.

We looked at several reports, studies and research papers about effective use of Pupil Premium and the intersection between socio-economic disadvantage and SEND. We also looked at a number of studies about the impact of the pandemic on disadvantaged learners. The pandemic has also given us deeper insights into family life for those from disadvantaged backgrounds and we have been able to forge stronger relationships with parents/guardians as a result.

We have also put a sharp focus on supporting teachers to develop their professional practice and train in specialist areas, allowing them to develop expertise and share them with other staff.

 

 

Pupil Premium 2020/21

Number of pupils in school: 190

Total number of pupils eligible for PPG: 105

Amount of PPG received per pupil: £1,320 per primary and £935 per secondary

Total amount of PPG received: £123 030

 

Background and context of PPG

PPG was introduced for pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM) at any point over the last 6 years with the intention of closing the attainment gap between disadvantaged and no-disadvantaged children.

There are no guidelines on how this money can be spent, although performance tables now contain information about the impact schools have made on closing the gap between different groups.

Schools must evidence strategies in place to raise the attainment of FSM pupils and what the associated costs are alongside attainment and progress figures for this group of children.

Since 2012 schools have been required to publish details of our PPG on our website, which must include:

  • The amount of the school’s allocation
  • Details of how it is intended to be spent
  • Details of how previous year allocation was spent
  • The effect of the expenditure on the attainment of the pupil’s grant was intended for

This should be an overall breakdown of funding and how effective it has proved.

 

Barriers to learning

  • All pupils have an Education, Health and Care Plan
  • All pupils have a significant level of cognition and learning difficulties
  • 80 pupils have speech language and communication difficulties. 60 of whom have support from the Speech and Language Therapy service
  • 29 pupils have English as an additional language and will usually have come into the UK with very little formal schooling before this point
  • 8 with additional medical needs that means they miss long periods of school or have many medical appointments
  • 17 pupils have SEMH difficulties alongside their learning needs
    • 2 of whom have been referred to SEN CAHMS; 4 to the Educational Psychology Service; 2 to the Behaviour and Attendance Team
    • 25 pupils have received additional support from the schools Health and Well Being Team
  • Many of our pupils live in the most deprived areas of Wolverhampton (54.8% FSM)

 

Objectives

  1. Ensure that pupils are taught in small class sizes and that each class has the support of a Teaching Assistant whenever possible
  2. Pupils make expected or above progress in English and Maths, in relation to their starting point and individual need
  3. Exclusion rates remain lower and disruption to classes is minimal
  4. Pupils social use of language (SULP) and confidence in using language improves
  5. School provides a positive approach to mental health issues in order to enable learning
  6. Additional staff training needed to enable those pupils with medical needs to remain in school for minor treatments
  7. Younger pupils are toilet trained by the end of KS1, therefore, enabling pupils more consistent time in lessons

 

Action Is this a new or additional action? Objective Intended outcomes Cost
SULP Continuation 4, 5 20 pupils are removed from SpLT register by the end of the year

 

All pupils make expected or above expected progress in communication by the end of the year

 

EAL pupils reach expected level

Full time SPT technician

£39,923

 

 

Well-Being TA Continuation 2,3 Number of short term exclusions decrease

Number of classroom disruptions decrease

Full time HLTA £39923

 

Interventions for Behaviour Support and Mental Health Mentoring Continuation 3, 5 Number of short term exclusions decrease

Number of classroom disruptions decrease

Mental Health Training – all staff

 (See Well-Being TA)
Additional training for some TA’s to administer to medical needs in school New 6 Pupils remain in school instead of attending medical appointments during the school day Training costs and payments for additional duties

£4500

Employ an additional TA to continue toilet training for the younger pupils 1,2,4,6 Enables trained staff to remain in classes

 

 

Part Time Care Assistant

£16923

TOTAL £121269

 

Pupil Premium 2019/2020

Number of pupils in school 190
Total number of pupils eligible for PPG 85
Amount of PPG received per pupil £1,320 per primary and £935 per secondary
Total amount of PPG received £119,130

 

Background and context of PPG
PPG was introduced for pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM) at any point over the last 6 years with the intention of closing the attainment gap between disadvantaged and no-disadvantaged children.

 

There are no guidelines on how this money can be spent, although performance tables now contain information about the impact schools have made on closing the gap between different groups.

Schools must evidence strategies in place to raise the attainment of FSM pupils and what the associated costs are alongside attainment and progress figures for this group of children.

Since 2012 schools have been required to publish details of our PPG on our website, which must include:

  • The amount of the school’s allocation
  • Details of how it is intended to be spent
  • Details of how previous year allocation was spent
  • The effect of the expenditure on the attainment of the pupil’s grant was intended for

This should be an overall breakdown of funding and how effective it has proved.

 

Barriers to learning
  • All pupils have an Education, Health and Care Plan
  • All pupils have a significant level of cognition and learning difficulties
  • 85 pupils have speech language and communication difficulties. 60 of whom have further additional support from the Speech and Language Therapy service
  • 29 pupils have English as an additional language and will usually have come into the UK with very little formal schooling before this point
  • 8 with additional medical needs that means they miss long periods of school or have many medical appointments
  • 19 pupils have SEMH difficulties alongside their learning needs
  • Many of our pupils live in the most deprived areas of Wolverhampton (54.8% FSM)

 

Objectives
  1. Ensure that pupils are taught in small class sizes and that each class has the support of a Teaching Assistant whenever possible
  2. Pupils make expected or above progress in English and Maths, in relation to their starting point and individual need
  3. Exclusion rates remain lower and disruption to classes is minimal
  4. Pupils social use of language (SULP) and confidence in using language improves
  5. School provides a positive approach to mental health issues in order to enable learning
  6. Younger pupils are toilet trained by the end of KS1, therefore, enabling pupils more consistent time in lessons

 

Action Is this a new or additional action? Objective Intended outcomes Cost
SULP Continuation/New 4, 5 20 pupils are removed from SpLT register by the end of the year

 

All pupils make expected or above expected progress in communication by the end of the year

 

EAL pupils reach expected level

Full time SPT technician

£36,923

 

Full Time Speech and Language Apprentice

£20004

 

Well-Being TA New 2,3 Number of short term exclusions decrease

Number of classroom disruptions decrease

Full time TA (new post) £36923

 

Interventions for Behaviour Support and Mental Health Mentoring New 3, 5 Number of short term exclusions decrease

Number of classroom disruptions decrease

Mental Health Training – all staff

 (See Well-Being TA)
Employ care assistant to continue toilet training for the younger pupils  Continuation 1,2,4,6 Enables trained staff to remain in classes

 

 

Part Time Care Assistant

£9303

Additional Lunchtime Supervisor to assist with managing the pupils throughout lunchtimes New 3 To ensure that behaviours remain positive and that lunchtimes have a higher staff:pupil ratio

 

 

£9303
TOTAL £112,456*

*Remainder of allocation for April 2019- March 2020 spent on last academic years objectives.